Posts Tagged ‘CWD’

What did it cost and who benefits?

Posted on July 27th, 2011 by Paul Stainthorp

This is going to be one of the hardest project blog posts to write…

The costs of getting Jerome to this stage are relatively easy to work out. Under the Infrastructure for Resource Discovery programme, JISC awarded us the sum of £36,585 which (institutional overheads aside) we used to pay for the following:

  • Developer staff time: 825 hours over six months.
  • Library and project staff time: 250 hours over six months.
  • The cost of travel to a number of programme events and relevant conferences at which we presented Jerome, including this one, this one, this one, this one and this one.

As all the other aspects of Jerome—hardware, software etc.—either already existed or were free to use, that figure represents the total cost of getting Jerome to its current state.

The benefits (see also section 2.4 of the original bid) of Jerome are less easily quantified financially, but we ought to consider these operational benefits:

1. The potential for using Jerome as a ‘production’ resource discovery system by the University of Lincoln. As such it could replace our current OPAC web catalogue as the Library’s primary public tool of discovery. The Library ought also to consider Jerome as a viable alternative to the purchase of a commercial, hosted next-generation resource discovery service (which it is currently reviewing), with the potential for replacing the investment it would make in such a system with investment in developer time to maintain and extend Jerome. In addition, the Common Web Design (on which the Jerome search portal is based) is inherently mobile-friendly.

2. Related: even if the Jerome search portal is not adopted in toto, there’s real potential for using Jerome’s APIs and code (open sourced) to enhance our existing user interfaces (catalogues, student portals, etc.) by ‘hacking in’ additional useful data and services via Jerome (similar to the Talis Juice service). This could lead to cost savings: a modern OPAC would not have to be developed in isolation or tools bought in. And these enhancements are as available to other institutions and libraries as much as to Lincoln.

3. The use of Jerome as an operational tool for checking and sanitising bibliographic data. Jerome can already be used to generate lists of ‘bad’ data (e.g. invalid ISBNs in MARC records); this intelligence could be fed back into the Library to make the work of cataloguers, e-resources admin staff, etc., easier and faster (efficiency savings) and again to improve the user experience.

4. Benefits of Open Data: in releasing our bibliographic collections openly Jerome is adding to the UK’s academic resource discovery ‘ecosystem‘, with benefits to scholarly activity both in Lincoln and elsewhere. We are already working with the COMET team at Cambridge University Library on a cross-Fens spin-off miniproject(!) to share data, code, and best practices around handling Open Data. Related to this are the ‘fuzzier’ benefits of associating the University of Lincoln’s name with innovation in technology for education (which is a stated aim in the University’s draft institutional strategy).

5. Finally, there is the potential for the university to use Jerome as a platform for future development: Jerome already sits in a ‘suite’ of interconnecting innovative institutional web services (excuse the unintentional alliteration!) which include the Common Web Design presentation framework, Total ReCal space/time data, lncn.eu URL shortener and link proxy, a university-wide open data platform, and the Nucleus data storage layer. Just as each of these (notionally separate) services has facilitated the development of all the others, so it’s likely that Jerome will itself act as a catalyst for further innovation.